How We Setup–The History of The Internet

This is how we setup a Website for a School Project about The History of the Internet.

We first researched the hits for “The History of the Internet” as a search term in Google.

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What we found is that there are 450,000 searches each month for this term. We hope to capture some of that traffic.

1. Registered the Domain Name: the-history-of-the-internet.com

We did this at: http://domains.interactivewebs.com/

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So we registered the domain name, and set Domain Name Servers to:

fserver2.fserver2.com

fserver3.fserver3.com

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2. Next we setup DNS servers for the domain name.

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and pointed the www.the-history-of-the-internet.com to the weebly website IP address that we have been assigned.

 

3. Then we updated the site settings in Weebly to accept the new domain name.

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4. Then we setup a Google Analytics tracking code.

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and pasted that to the Weebly settings so that every page would be tracked.

5. Then we added meta tag and page description data to every page of the website.

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6. Next we blogged the site and linked to the URL, in an attempt to bring the page ranking and linking index up for the domain: http://www.the-history-of-the-internet.com/

7. Once the site has some hits from the 450,000 lookups each month, we plan to introduce some paid advertising to help cover the cost of the domain name registration.

Understanding Web-Safe Fonts / Web Friendly Fonts

imageWe have often receive lots of questions about Web-safe fonts, or web friendly fonts. We have products that work with technologies like Microsoft Word, and publish back to websites like DotNetNuke. (DNN Word Editor)

The issue is that not all fonts will work on all browsers on all computers. Here is the reason why.

Web-Safe Fonts

There are an awful lot of fonts in the world! For years, no doubt, you’ve been using a ton of them in word processing documents, party invitations, banners, etc. But have you ever noticed how few of them are used on the web?

There’s a really good reason for this. When a web page loads, the browser is told to write text onto the screen using a specified font—one that is stored on the computer that the browser is running on. Therefore, if the web page’s code is calling for a font that a user does not have installed on their computer, it won’t show up! What that person will instead see is a default font, which might look a little ugly.

Now you might be wondering why this will happen so often if there are so many fonts installed on your computer. Well, here’s the problem: the two most widely-used operating systems—Windows and Mac OS X—each come installed with a different set of fonts. Awesome!

To illustrate this point, here’s where the fonts are stored in Windows 7:

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And here’s where they’re stored on Mac OS 10.6:

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Right away, we can see that only one of the displayed fonts overlaps: Arial. None of the Calibri orCambria fonts are available on the Mac, and the Mac has at least a dozen just on this page that aren’t available in Windows!

In fact, between these two systems, there are only ten fonts that overlap:

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Those fonts that fall into that middle area, covered by both operating systems, are what we callweb-safe fonts. If you use Calibri on your webpage, Mac users won’t see it; if you use Andale, Windows users won’t see it; but if you use Georgia, you can rest assured that users of both systems will see the it.

Now there’s a bit of grey area here. Users of older operating systems don’t have some of these fonts we’ve declared web-safe. For example, Windows XP users don’t have Palatino or Trebuchet MS. Even worse, users of Android mobile phones don’t have any of these fonts.

So to be clear, there are only five fonts that are considered universal:

  • Arial
  • Courier New
  • Georgia
  • Times New Roman
  • Verdana

Feel free to use these fonts all you want! Even if you dug up that old Packard Bell you had back in 1997 and it didn’t explode when connected to the modern web, you’d be able to see these fonts rendered as intended. Those Android users will just have to fight for themselves.

Web Safe Fonts Table

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*The green marks show very common fonts, the yellow shows not so common but all are generally accepted as web safe.

So, what happens when the font fails?

Your text will still be visible, but the browser will use whatever default font it supplies for situations like this. This means that you may have intended to use a cute, scripty font, but what you get is

Your text typed in a regular serif font.

This is good because your content still goes through, but your design might be compromised. Therefore, you should always specify fallback fonts and a category that the font falls into. Let’s say that you want to use Helvetica, but you’ll settle for Arial. Since both of these fonts are considered to be sans-serif fonts, you can write a CSS declaration like this:

{ font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; }

The browser will first try to use Helvetica, and if it’s not installed, it’ll attempt to use Arial. If even that font is not available, it’ll use whatever default sans-serif font the browser likes, but at least it’ll be the correct type of font!

For more information about coding fallbacks, alternative methods to using non-web-safe fonts, and everything typography related, you can pick up a copy of our Web Typography Handbook. It’ll tell you everything you need to know.

Bing Ajax Control over HTTPS or HTTP Secure SSL

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Today we updated some code in our Contact Details module for DotNetNuke.

The module makes it easy to add your contact details to a page in DNN.

There is a map control function that uses Bing Maps that can be seen in the demo here: http://www.interactivewebs.com/contactdetails/Demo.aspx

We have updated the module today to support the use of SSL or https connections to the page that contains the module.

How we did this

So here are the two ways to add the Bing Ajax control to your page in HTTP or HTTPS:

HTTP:

<script src=”http://ecn.dev.virtualearth.net/mapcontrol/mapcontrol.ashx?v=6.3” type="text/javascript"></script>

HTTPS:

<script src=”https://ecn.dev.virtualearth.net/mapcontrol/mapcontrol.ashx?v=6.3&s=1” type="text/javascript"></script>

Now on the HTTPS version notice I changed the URL to start with HTTPS, this is what pulls from the secure site over at the good Bing folks. Also notice I added the “s” parameter and set it to 1, default is 0, this tells the Bing API to get the image tiles for the map from HTTPS.

Why? you ask.

Well it seems that the API determines what protocol to use for JavaScript and other parts from the document.location.protocol, however when it comes to the map tiles it looks to a global setting that is set based on the parameter being passed.

Captivate SCORM reporting completed but not passed

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Captivate SCORM Problems

We have been playing in depth lately with some some of the Captivate SCORM outputs in an effort to better understand the SCORM Compliance and where Captivate falls down in this area. What we have found is very interesting and needs to be explained in detail to understand.

The Problem

Until recently, anyone who wanted to author SCORM-compliant content had few choices. Not many authoring programs existed and the technical knowledge to create compliant content was and, in fact, still is beyond the reach of most training developers. Now there are many affordable, easy to use content authoring programs to create SCORM-compliant content that can be deployed to learning management systems (LMS). Adobe, a leader in the multimedia authoring and programming industry, has recently thrown their hat into the ring and released Adobe Captivate – a SCORM-compliant authoring tool that includes screen capture, simulation, automated testing and more.

Adobe Captivate and LMS Software Working Correctly

When exporting content from Adobe Captivate, you have the option of making your package SCORM 1.2 Compliant. Specifics of the SCORM specification could fill an entire book (in fact, it does!), so let’s just say that SCORM defines what must be included in a content package (certain files which contain certain information in a certain format) and the methods that the content package must use to communicate information (student name, score, etc.) to and from the LMS. The idea is that content authoring programs and learning management systems would all be programmed to comply with the spec and therefore be compatible with each other. Unfortunately, reality has not lived up to the vision.

The SCORM 1.2 specification is long, open to some interpretation and not always logical. Developers have had to make some assumptions and, at the same time, had to predict and hope that other developers made the same assumptions! Our experience with the workings of Adobe Captivate and the development or our own SCORM-compliant LMS has given us some insight to help you get the most out of Adobe Captivate and your LMS – even if it’s not our LMS! Note that we are only focusing on SCORM 1.2. The SCORM 1.3 specification was recently released, however most learning management systems and authoring tools, even those recently released, still support SCORM 1.2 and rightfully so.

Problem 1 – Setting Captivate to be SCORM 1.2 Compliant

If you export a Captivate package that does not have any graded questions in it, it will not be SCORM-compliant. I don’t mean that it just won’t track because it has no grade to send; I mean it is not compliant. In tracing method calls from Captivate lessons, we’ve found that a lesson with no questions will not make the required call to the LMS to initialize itself upon start-up. It will make the finalize call upon exit, however any compliant LMS will throw back an error when this happens. The spec dictates that a content package must initialize itself before it can finalize itself. Makes sense, right?

A tangential problem to this is that a lesson with no questions (even if the correct initialize and finalize calls are made) has no way to tell when it’s been completed, so it does not send that information to the LMS either. This secondary problem is not an issue of compliance as the SCORM specification does not require this information to be sent, but more an issue of usability. What’s the point of making a SCORM-compliant lesson and loading it into an LMS if you never find out when your users have completed it?

Solution 1 – Captivate SCORM Solved

The resolution to both these problems is easy – just make sure that you have a graded interaction in your lesson. It can be an interaction that is actually presented as such or even a button or hot spot that you are sure your users will click while viewing the lesson. The possibilities here are endless, so be sure to test your solution, but the bottom line is that there needs to at least one graded interaction in your lesson.

Problem 2 – Passing the Proper Lesson Status Value

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Adobe Captivate lets you choose whether to report ‘pass/fail’ or ‘complete/incomplete’ values for lesson status, but this is not an arbitrary choice. The spec dictates that this shall be determined by the lesson after querying the LMS and deciding based upon the response it receives.

When publishing with Captivate, if you select complete/incomplete, and the user fails or fails to finish the lesson, the value of ‘incomplete’ will be reported to the LMS. In the event that the user completes or passes the lesson, the value of ‘complete’ will be reported to the LMS. Likewise, if you select pass/fail, then the value of ‘pass’ will be used instead of ‘complete’ and the value of ‘fail’ will be used instead of ‘incomplete’.

Additionally, Captivate lessons never query the LMS for the value of ‘credit’, which is the element that the lesson should be using to determine whether to use ‘complete/incomplete’ or ‘pass/fail’.

Problem 2 – Solution to Captivate Lesson Status Value

Solving this problem may or may not even be necessary – it’s a rather minor issue. The best thing to do is make sure that you coordinate the credit setting you use in the LMS with the lesson status value you select here. Lessons that are for credit should use ‘pass/fail’ and lessons that are not for credit should use ‘complete/incomplete’. However, one thing to note, and this takes us indirectly to Problem #3 and beyond, is that the spec dictates that the LMS revaluate the score and change this value if you have set a mastery score. We’ll come back to this when we get to Problem #4.

Problem 3 – Passing Score in the SCORM Format

The ‘Publish’ interface in Adobe Captivate lets you choose whether to report score as a raw value or as a percentage while the spec dictates that this value must be ‘normalized between 0 and 100′ (meaning it must be a percentage score). When you choose to report this value as a raw score, your lesson is not compliant.

Adobe tells us that they put this option for a very specific reason. The spec defines 3 values relating to score and all shall be normalized between 0 and 100 – minimum score, maximum score and what they call raw score (oddly enough, the spec calls it ‘raw score’ and at the same time dictates that it be normalized – no wonder everyone is confused!). Logically, since they are required to be normalized between 0 and 100, minimum score would always be 0 and maximum score would always be 100 so why even use them? Because of this confusion, Adobe decided to allow the content author to decide whether to report score as raw or normalized.

The problem occurs when you choose to report score as raw and then load your content into an LMS that has been implemented according to the SCORM spec because it will expect to receive score normalized. Confusion ensues!

You create a Captivate lesson and choose to report score as a raw value. Your lesson has 5 questions and your user gets them all correct. Your lesson is going to report ’5′ as the score and a compliant LMS is going to interpret this as 5%. Of course, your lesson should also report a lesson status of ‘complete’ or ‘passed’ (see problem #2) which will truly confuse your user when they look at their stats and see that they passed/completed a lesson with a score of only 5%!

Problem 3 – Solution to Passing SCORM Score Correctly

This is an easy one. Unless you are certain that your LMS implements score as a raw value, always select ‘percentage’ to ensure that your lesson is compliant.

Problem 4 – Making it all Work

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Take a deep breath, because problem #4 might get a little confusing. The SCORM specification instructs the LMS to change the lesson status (the same value discussed in problem #2) when certain conditions apply. When this happens, the LMS shall use the score to decide how to change the lesson status value. If you remember though, from problem #3, you may be reporting score as a non-compliant raw value, so the LMS may change the lesson status based on bad information.

To get a better understanding of this, let’s introduce mastery score. You set the mastery score by clicking the ‘Manifest’ button on the Publish Interface. mastery score is value stored in the manifest file that is included in the content package you load into the LMS. The LMS reads this value and stores it with the lesson. If you notice, Captivate instructs that this value should be between 0 and 100, or normalized.

Now the SCORM specification instructs the LMS that if mastery score is set, the lesson is being taken for credit and the lesson status is not ‘incomplete’, the LMS shall change the lesson status to the appropriate value (complete, incomplete, pass or fail) by comparing the score reported from the lesson and the mastery score that is defined in the manifest. This occurs even if the lesson has already passed a value for lesson status.

The first thing to notice is that you probably should set the mastery score to the same value that you set passing score. That way, if the LMS re-evaluates the lesson status, it will use the same value as the passing score that the lesson itself does.

Now let’s refer back to Problem #3. You had the option of reporting score as a raw value. If you chose that option, when the LMS performs this re-evaluation of lesson status, it is going to compare a raw score to the normalized mastery score. Since one value is normalized and the other is not, it should be clear that you will have some unexpected results from this.

Example

You create a Captivate lesson with 20 questions. You choose to report score as a raw value (non-complaint per Problem #3, but Captivate lets you do it), choose to use ‘pass/fail’ for lesson status, enter a mastery score of 80% and enter a passing score of 80%. Your user gets 17 questions correct.

When the lesson finalizes, the lesson reports ‘pass’ to the LMS for lesson status and ’17′ for score. Everything looks good until the LMS sees that there is a mastery score and therefore it must re-evaluate the lesson status. The LMS looks at score (’17′) and sees that it is less than mastery score (’80′), so it changes lesson status to ‘fail’. In fact, a lesson created with these settings will always have its lesson status re-evaluated to ‘fail’ by the LMS because even a perfect raw score (’20′) will always be less than the mastery score (’80′).

The root of the problem is that Captivate prompts you to enter mastery score normalized, but gives you the option to report score as a raw value. They need to be on the same scale for the re-evaluation by the LMS to work properly.

Solutions

Solution 1 – Don’t enter a mastery score. By doing this, the LMS will not re-evaluate the lesson status and you avoid the problem altogether. But don’t forget about Problem #3 and its solution.

Solutions 2 – Make sure that mastery score and score are both normalized by choosing to report score as a ‘percentage.’ You’ll notice that this is also the solution to Problem #3. If you have confirmed that your LMS expects to receive score as raw, then use Solution #3.

Solution 3 – If you must report score as a raw value, then be sure to enter a raw value for mastery score. In our scenario, instead of entering ’80′ for mastery score, you would enter ’17′. That way, when the LMS re-evaluates lesson status, both score and mastery score are on the same scale and the calculation is done correctly. While technically incorrect since the spec dictates that mastery score be normalized, we won’t worry about it because you’d only use this solution in the case that your LMS is also non-compliant because it’s expecting raw values for score. It’s a workaround.

Conclusion

We’ve seen that Adobe Captivate provides a robust solution for quickly developing online training solutions. But let’s not forget that we need to be mindful of the implementation of the SCORM specification by the LMS and how it’s going to react to our Captivate lessons.

Review the problems and their solutions and you can be sure that your Captivate lessons are going to comply with SCORM 1.2 and function properly when loaded into a SCORM 1.2-compliant learning management system.

Chrome–An additional plug-in is required to display some elements on this page–Solved

Install Plug-in

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If you are receiving this error in Chrome, and finding that installing the plugin does absolutely nothing.

And clicking the":

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Takes you to a Windows media and Java error page.

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http://www.google.com/support/chrome/bin/answer.py?answer=95697&topic=14687&hl=en-US

Which if you bother to follow the instructions will not help you at all.

The cause

Almost certainly the cause of this problem is going to be a recent update by Skype. One could posture that it did not take long after the Microsoft purchase for Skype to become annoying, but I am saddened to say that I thin they have buggered it up without needing to call anyone from the Vista development team.

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The most recent update of Skype 5.6.0.8.442 adds a little feature to your browsers (without asking you) that reads numbers that look like phone numbers and allows you to click and call them in Skype.

It also adds a little blue Skype thing to the top of you page:

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The Solution

So the fix to stop Chrome asking you about installing a plug-in all the time is to disable the Skype plugin in Chrome.

1. Click the spanner

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2. Tools \ Extensions

3. Un-tick the Skype Extension

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That should be all you need to do to stop Skype mucking up your browser.

 

Thoughts

It is bad practice for Skype or anyone to add invasive features such as this that “take over” your experience without making it clear in the install process that this is being done. Skype did it in the past then dropped the idea. Not sure why they have returned to it, but it sucks!

I remember the annoying days of Real Player and their invasive installs that totally bombarded you with their crappy experience. I hope that Skype is not taking that path.

Interestingly the only other plugin that I found installed in Chrome that I was not asked specifically if I wanted installed was a RealPlayer extension.

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Funny that!~

Outlook Hangs (stops responding) Opening Email Messages Sent from PayPal

Outlook hangs caused by PayPal messages template fault

imageIn just the last few days, I have started experiencing some issues with Outlook when opening messages sent from PayPal.

This is happening with the recent versions of Outlook, including Outlook 2010 and Outlook 2007.

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Some of the indications of the problem include.

  • Outlook taking longer than normal to open.
  • Outlook with “Reading Pane” on
  • Outlook Stops Responding when clicking on an email from PayPal.
  • If you wait a long time, it will come good, and even show the email message.
  • If you are impatient and cancel out of outlook, your reading pane is gone when you next open it.

When loading Outlook you receive a message about and address: Contacting: \\102.112.207.net\b\ss\paypalglobal\1\G.4-NS

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Background information

It appears that the cause of this is some malformed tracking cookies being sent from PayPal.

While it could be argued that Outlook should handle this invalid link much better than it does… We all know that Microsoft is responsible for Outlook, so really we should not expect too much in the way of “graceful error handling”. (After 20+ years of Windows system events, they still don’t have an online library of error codes and meanings.)

At the bottom of the message, there is a hidden tracking image. Instead of this image pointing to a web server, it is pointing to a non-existing network share. As it is pointing to a network share and not to a web server, Outlook’s “Internet picture blocking” functionality doesn’t kick in and tries to retrieve the content.

So what to do what to do?

First, I know for a fact that PayPal is aware of this issue, and while it is literally a 10 min fix for the right person, we know that finding the right person probably means contacting the dev team out of India that they hired last month, and asking them to fix their crap!

Oh I have been doing this too long!

Really… what to do!

  1. Nothing… If you are patient when opening email messages from PayPal while this issue happens, then they will open.
  2. Delete all recent messages from PayPal permanently form both your inbox and deleted items.
  3. Turn off the reading pane in Outlook.
  4. Turn your Outlook into plain text preview
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  5. Redirect the invalid call using a modification to hosts

    1. Start Notepad as an administrator.
      You can do this by right clicking on the Notepad shortcut in the Start Menu and choosing “Run as administrator”. If you don’t see this option, hold SHIFT while right clicking on it.
    2. Choose File-> Open… and open the following file;
      C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\hosts
    3. Add the following line at the bottom.
      127.0.0.1        102.112.2o7.net
    4. Save the file and close Notepad.

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    4. Save the file.

  6. This will basically route 2o7.net request back to your computer, which will reject it, allowing you to read your emails quickly and in peace once again.
    This fix will work on 32/64 bit versions of both Vista and Win 7


If you still have a problem

In Microsoft Windows, use the command ipconfig /flushdns to flush the DNS resolver cache. Open the command prompt and type the following:

C:>ipconfig /flushdns
Windows IP Configuration
Successfully flushed the DNS Resolver Cache.

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Corporate solution for all computer clients at once

If you are in a corporate network, your system administrators can fix this for everyone at once by adding a Forward Lookup Zone (Primary Zone) for the 102.112.2o7.net domain. Then add an A host record without a name and have it resolve to 127.0.0.1.

After PayPal fix the issue.

The invalid link when fixed will not fix messages already sent with the issue. So unless you permanently delete message with the problem, you will see the trouble each time outlook references them for reading. This is because the reference is totally invalid, not just temporarily down.

How to stop – Only secure content is displayed in IE9 message

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If you use IE9, you must be familiar with this message: “Only secure content is displayed.”

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This kind of messages are implemented by Microsoft because they want to inform you that you are about to access some unsecured content on a website. This is actually a security purpose message. Unfortunately, this kind of messages are more often annoying or unnecessary than useful. Internet explorer show this message when the same website page contain both secured and unsecured content: in this way, some unsecured scripts may have access to secured data on that page. Same thing happens when you play a game (unsecured scripts) on Facebook and want to publish that game information on your wall (secured action).

1. Launch Internet Explorer.
2. Go to Tools -> Internet Options.

Then, navigate to Security tab.

3. Click on “Custom level” button.

4. Search for “Display mixed content” under Miscellaneous section. Change it to enable.

Select Yes and that’s all.

Mac OSX Lion Upgrade Problems

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Today, like a kid in a candy store, I upgraded to the new Mac OSX Lion from the Mac App store.

It can’t go without noting that it has been a long time since I was excited about the prospect of a new release software download. Today gave me glimpses of the days long gone when Microsoft would release new and innovative software. Those days are “dust in the rear-view mirror”. True geek like I know… but hay! You are the one reading this!

So How Did it Go?

Generally it went exceptionally well.

  1. The download was way faster than I expected. I had imagined that the apple servers would be getting hammered all day, but that was not the case. The 4 GB package came down in around 30 min on a Telstra Australia cable connection.
  2. The initial install and reboot was fast. Around 1 minute and a MacBook Pro running an SSD hard disk.
  3. The setup and install of the operating system was reported by the software to be around 30 minutes, but took less than 20. Not bad for a new 4 GB operating system. The important thing was that there were no errors or stalls. At one stage the screen went to sleep or reset with a blank screen. Space Bar fixed that. So no problems there.
  4. After reboot, there was one small glitch. The OS detected that a new version of Java was required to be downloaded. The download window started and on first attempt stopped after about 50% download. It stalled and did not go further. I could not quit the program so decided to reboot. After which it prompted again and this time the download reached 100% 63.3 Meg from memory. However it stopped and did not appear to install.

    Again I rebooted but wised up to this download. Rather than say, install. I quit the auto detected download prompt. Then went to the “Software Update” and asked it to check for updates. This time the updated worked, along with an iTunes update. All good.

 

More Findings – Mail

We noticed that the Mail application that was updated and previously linked with an Exchange connection to our Exchange server 2010 ended up with two accounts. Both with the same details and same settings, both of them as IMAP accounts, and not exchange accounts.

The Fix

We deleted both accounts from Mail. Then added the exchange connected account again, and this worked. Holding the details as an Exchange account.

Not sure why this happened, but it did happen on 3 machines.

More about Microsoft Office for Mac on Lion

Over the weekend Microsoft published a knowledge base article that outlines some known issues with Office for Mac on OS X 10.7. Overall, if you have Office 2004 and rely on it, then do not upgrade to OS X Lion until you have an alternative Office version installed (2008 or preferably 2011). Office 2004 is PowerPC code, and as with Intuit’s Quicken 2007 and earlier versions, if you install Lion then you will not be able to launch Office 2004.

Luckily there are options, including the ability to upgrade, or even install Snow Leopard in an alternative partition so you can still use Rosetta, but these may require you to either purchase new software licenses or set up a relatively cumbersome dual-boot situation.

In addition to the lack of support for Office 2004, there are a few situations in which Office 2008 and 2011 applications may crash. In Excel, a crash may occur when moving spread sheets between workbooks. PowerPoint may also crash when you use Command-Tab in presentation viewer mode. The only other known crash situations involve Communicator (only in Office 2011), which may shut down when initiating calls or messages.

If you regularly use any of these options or application functions, then you might consider waiting to upgrade to Lion until they are fixed.

 

Some Other Issues Especially in Xcode

The other interesting observation is that the scrolling is not only reversed (which we don’t essentially mind) but that in a few applications the scrolling is so bad it is virtually unusable. Xcode is a great example.

When using the new revered scrolling to browse simple lists of code, the stop start nature of the scrolling is so bad that it is almost unusable. It feels like your fingers may not have enough pressure when in actual fact they do!

Summary

All in all the update was exceptional. I cannot help but think back to MS updates that totally killed my system so often that I would NEVER consider a Windows Update, but would always start fresh with a new install. (What a pain). Never gain! Apple, your careful eye to easy end user experience has mean that as an advanced Windows Server Administrator I have never needed to “look under the hood” at your OS. Thanks for that!

That being said, clearly there are some bugs. Some of like the scrolling in Xcode make me wonder if updating is really necessary until they patch things like this.

YouTube Search Results as RSS Feed

imageToday we were working on producing some custom Youtube video searches that output to RSS feed. The intent being to then consume the result into a Yahoo Pipes manipulation and ultimately use the result in a new iPhone / iPad app.

Google and Youtube have made the quite easy, which was nice.

YouTube Search as RSS

Search

If you wanted to search for the term “A380” (like the aircraft) then you would use a URL like this: http://www.youtube.com/rss/search/a380.rss 

http://www.youtube.com/rss/search/[SEARCH_TERMS].rss

Tag

If you wanted to find all the videos recently posted that are tagged “A380” you would use a URL like this: http://www.youtube.com/rss/tag/a380.rss

Two Words

The above examples can have a space in the search. "Airbus A380” would be:

http://www.youtube.com/rss/search/airbus%20a380.rss

Must have the two words

Using the + sign you can conjoin two words.

http://www.youtube.com/rss/search/airbus+a380.rss

However this appears to deliver the same results as the above search.

Google YouTube API

There is an API available to do more complex searches. These produce some interesting results. The API is available here.

YouTube User Search

Using a USER ID like ours “interactivewebs” you can find all the videos published by us using this search: http://www.youtube.com/rss/user/interactivewebs/videos.rss

Sorting

It is possible to sort the search results using a tag on the end that looks like this:

=video-date-uploaded.rss

http://www.youtube.com/rss/search/a380=video-date-uploaded.rss

Also

Did you know, you can use complex boolean searches at YouTube, and get these out as an RSS feed, but that you may need to fiddle with the feed url to get it to work properly.
You can use:
  quoted strings
  parenthesis ( …. )
  AND
  OR
  "-" for negation (or is it just excluding the next word)
in searches.  For example here is a search I just conducted:
("light sport aircraft" OR (microlight OR ultralight OR lightsportaircraft OR lsa)) AND -ultralightnews
Fancy huh.  You can grab this as an RSS by using the rss link in your browser should it provide it, however take note, that YouTube seems to cut the query short in the RSS link if it’s too long (and doesn’t fully evaluate it either if you force it), and it does not return in the expected "most recent upload" order, so some modification of the string is necessary to make it useful.  Here’s the RSS feed for the above search
http://gdata.youtube.com/feeds/base/videos?q=(%22light%20sport%20aircraft%22%20OR%20(microlight%20OR%20ultralight%20OR%20lightsportaircraft%20OR%20lsa))%20AND%20-ultralightnews&client=ytapi-youtube-search&alt=rss&v=1&orderby=published

Returning Large Images of the Feed

We also found a neat little search that looks like this:

http://gdata.youtube.com/feeds/base/videos?q=%28a380%29youtube-search&alt=rss&v=1&orderby=published

The end result of this produces some great looking feeds for our use.

Hope this helps others.